March 27, 2016

DIY Easy How To Antique Glaze Furniture Using Glaze, Dark Wax, Or Stain

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Have you ever wanted to give your furniture a new look? A look that adds class, depth, and gives you an antique vintage look? Then why not try this antique glaze furniture tutorial? It’s very simple, inexpensive, extremely detailed, takes little to no time at all to do, and I give you all the information that you’ll need to know.

Glazing works awesome on furniture that has detail, crevices, and molding. You can do glazing on lots of things like kitchen cabinets, doors, crown molding, furniture, and the list goes on.  To antique glaze furniture you can use a glazing product, dark furniture wax or wood stain. Everyone has their own preference, though personally I like using a glazing product best. I got my glaze at Lowes, Valspar makes it. There are several other companies that make glaze, Lowes was just the closest to me. I also found it at Sherman-Williams too. Although Sherman-Williams is discontinuing their glaze line, but you still may be able to find some there. There are glazes that you can mix yourself with any color paint and stain or choose from several other premixed glaze colors. To antique glaze furniture, you can also use a dark furniture wax or wood stain to get the same effect. Lowes carries furniture wax, you can also find it at several other places, or online. In this tutorial I’ll be showing you how to antique glaze furniture with a glazing product, wood stain, or furniture wax. To antique glaze furniture, you don’t use all 3 products. Choose from one of those for the glazing process. The process for using each product does vary slightly, but will all give you that antique vintage look.

 

To start out with the piece that you’re glazing, it needs to be painted or stained first. Glazing works best on furniture that is light in color, so that you’ll be able to see the glaze. Though you can glaze a dark-colored piece of furniture with a light-colored glaze. I haven’t tried that yet, but I’ll definitely be trying it soon.

Antique Glaze Furniture

I refinished an antique vanity, that I found on Craigslist for 100$. I painted it with the Rust-oleum silver metallic oil-based paint, that is a brush on paint. I wanted to give it some more class, depth, and a gothic style look. The drawers are hand carved and I really wanted to bring that out too, which glazing will definitely do. To antique glaze furniture, you’ll first need to decide which glazing product to use. Below is a list of what you’ll need and the process.

What you’ll need to Antique Glaze Furniture


  1. Glazing product, wood stain, or dark and clear furniture wax.
  2. Paint brush
  3. Lint-free rag ( I use ripped up t-shirts) baby wipes work good too
  4. Mineral spirits(paint thinner) if you mess up your wood stain glaze.
  5. Clear top coat protecting finish(optional) for if you’re using a glazing product or stain. You don’t need this if you’re using dark and clear furniture wax.
  6. Light grit sand paper, for if you’re using a clear top coat protecting finish.
  7. Tack cloth, for if you’re using a clear top coat protecting finish.

PREMIXED GLAZING PRODUCT- If you’re using a premixed glaze, you’re ready to go.

NON-PREMIXED GLAZING PRODUCT- If your glaze isn’t pre-mixed you’ll need to mix your glaze using this ratio (4:1) by mixing 4 parts of your glaze to 1 part of your color in a small container. You can use paint or stain for your coloring. You won’t need very much glaze. I suggest mixing 1 cup for a very large piece. Glaze goes a long way. A quart of glaze will last you for many projects.

STAIN- If you’re using stain, then you’re ready to go.

DARK FURNITURE WAX- If you’re using dark furniture wax, you need to apply a coat of the clear wax first. Apply the wax with a brush, rubbing it all over and into your piece. This will help you to easily manipulate, move, and wipe your dark wax.  Using a clear wax first also ensures that you won’t ruin your piece, because the dark wax will stain or completely change the color.

Antique Glaze Furniture

To antique glaze furniture you need to apply your glaze, stain, or dark wax with a brush, making sure to get it into all the nooks and crannies. My piece has hand carvings that I glazed.

Antique Glaze Furniture

You can apply as much or as little as you like. Depending on your piece, everyone has their own taste. With each product, always work in small sections. This helps so your product doesn’t dry before you’re ready to wipe it off.

Antique Glaze Furniture

GLAZING PRODUCT- Glaze dries fast, so always work in small sections and only leave it on for 15 seconds. Take your lint-free rag and lightly start wiping away your glaze. Leaving as much or as little as you like. If you wiped away too much, just let it dry and then reapply. Most glaze is water based. So if it dried too fast or you used too much, just dip your rag into some water and this will help to get it off.

DARK FURNITURE WAX- Wax will dry fast, so always work in small sections and only leave it on for 15 seconds. If your dark wax is too hard to apply you can mix some clear wax in it, in a separate container. Take your lint-free rag and lightly wipe away your wax, leaving as much or as little as you like. If you have problems getting it off, put some clear wax on your rag. If you wiped away too much, just let it dry then reapply.

WOOD STAIN- Wood stain will dry fast, so always work in small sections and only leave it on for 15 seconds. Take your lint-free rag and lightly wipe away your stain. You can leave as much or as little as you like. If you wiped away too much, just let it dry then reapply. If it dries too fast and you used too much, then you can use a rag dipped in your mineral spirits to clean it up. Just make sure that your base paint is a water based paint, because the mineral spirits will wipe your paint off too.

Antique Glaze Furniture

Antique Glaze Furniture

I applied my glaze twice and fairly thick to get this look.

Once you’re finished with your glazing and it’s completely dry, you can apply a clear protecting finish.  This step is optional. I do suggest to apply a protecting finish, especially if your piece will be in a high traffic area with lots of hands on activity.

Rust-Oleum's painter's touch clear gloss

I like to use Rust-oleum’s non-yellowing clear gloss. It works great, doesn’t yellow, and doesn’t have a harsh odor.

GLAZING PRODUCT- You can use a clear gloss protecting finish. Just make sure that it’s a non-yellowing product. You can also use a clear furniture wax. I’ve seen several tutorials that say to use a polyurethane. I suggest “NOT” to use a polyurethane because this could cause your piece to turn yellow, especially on a light-colored piece and nobody wants that! There are several other products you could use like a brush on epoxy or a brush on lacquer, but just make sure you follow the instructions appropriately. I like to use Rust-oleum’s non-yellowing clear gloss. I’ve found this at Home Depot. This is a gloss, so it will make your piece shiny. Apply it with a paint brush. I did 3 coats on mine. Make sure that you let each coat thoroughly dry. Also you should “lightly” sand each coat that you do.  This will help for better adhesion and will give your piece a smoother finish.Then dust off and wipe with a tack cloth to remove any excess dust particles to ensure a perfect finish. DO NOT SAND YOUR FINAL COAT. Clear wax can be used to achieve a glossy or flat finish. If you’re using a clear furniture wax, apply it with a clean lint-free rag or brush. Once your clear wax is dry, buff with a clean lint-free rag to give it a nice shine or don’t for a flat finish This may take a bit of elbow grease. Also clear wax will build up in your grooves and crevices. Check your piece and use a clean lint-free rag or a q-tip to clean it out.

DARK FURNITURE WAX- Use clear wax for your protecting finish. Clear wax can give you a shiny or flat finish. You can apply it with a clean lint-free rag or brush. Once your clear wax is dry, buff with a clean lint-free rag to give it a nice shine or don’t for a flat finish This may take a bit of elbow grease. Also clear wax will build up in your grooves and crevices. Check your piece and use a clean lint-free rag or a q-tip to clean it out.

WOOD STAIN- You can use a clear gloss protecting finish. Just make sure that it’s a non-yellowing product. You can also use a clear furniture wax. I’ve seen several tutorials that say to use a polyurethane. I suggest “NOT” to use a polyurethane (unless it’s a wood piece, that you only used wood stain on) because this could cause your piece to turn yellow, especially on a light-colored piece and nobody wants that! Polyurethane is made for a wood stain finish, so if you’re glazing with a stain over a stain then you can use a polyurethane. There are several other products you could use like a brush on epoxy, or a brush on lacquer but just make sure you follow the instructions appropriately. I like to use Rust-oleum’s non-yellowing Clear gloss. I’ve found this at Home Depot. This is a gloss, so it will make your piece shiny. Apply it with a paint brush. I did 3 coats on mine. Make sure that you let each coat thoroughly dry before adding the next. Also you should “lightly” sand each coat that you do. This will help for better adhesion and will give your piece a smoother finish.Then dust off and wipe with a tack cloth to remove any excess dust particles to ensure a perfect finish. DO NOT SAND YOUR FINAL COAT. Clear furniture wax can be used, to achieve a glossy or flat finish. Apply it with a clean lint-free rag or brush. Once your clear wax is dry, buff with a clean lint-free rag to give it a nice shine or don’t for a flat finish. This may take a bit of elbow grease. Also clear wax will build up in your grooves and crevices. Check your piece and use a clean lint-free rag or a q-tip to clean it out.

Antique Glaze Furniture

Antique Glaze Furniture

Here’s how my vanity turned out. I’m not completely done with it yet. I want to add a glass shelf in the middle. In a future post I’ll be revealing the whole vanity and the process, so stay tuned.

Try out my how to antique glaze furniture tutorial and let me know how it worked out for you. What products did you use? How did it turn out? I’d love to see photos and hear your feedback! Also stay tuned for several other antique glaze furniture tutorials coming soon.

If you liked this tutorial then you should definitely try this DIY Easy Furniture Or Wall Stencil Tutorial. I guarantee you’ll be happy with the stress free, no mess results!!

Be sure to stop by the Gallery too and pin as much as your little black hearts desire. Stop back every day, I’m constantly adding new content.

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